Positions Available

PhD Studentships


Prof Paul is always keen to find high quality PhD students for any of the funded areas in the group. If you are interested in undertaking a PhD related to any of the topics discussed in the web pages, please contact Prof Paul.

Stacks Image 60
Photonic MEMS vacuum traps for cold atoms

In this fully funded PhD project you will integrated diode laser with photonic cavities and MEMS vacuum chambers to allow the trapping and control of atoms by light. The work is supported by the UK Quantum Technology Programme and the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Trapping atoms with light has enable atoms to be cooled to below microKelvin temperatures resulting in the most accurate set of sensors that can be used for timing, measuring acceleration, rotation or gravity. Trapped atoms can also form qubits and are also being used to build quantum computers. Such sensors presently require large vacuum chambers with high power lasers to trap atoms with hundreds of Watts of power for operation. This project aims to miniaturize these atom traps using the diode lasers similar to CD/DVD players combined with optical cavities integrated with atoms in MEMS vacuum systems aiming to reduce the size, weight and power to allow these sensors to reduce to the size of a mobile phone and to be powered by batteries.

The work will be under the supervision of Prof Douglas Paul who presently holds a Royal Academy of Engineering Chair in Emerging Technologies with the aim of developing cold atom atomic clocks, rotation sensors and accelerometers that can form a quantum navigator which could fit inside a mobile phone. The work will include being trained in the micro- and nano-fabrication of devices in the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre combined with simulation and full characterisation of the devices using electronic and optical techniques. The successful student will have access to well equipped laboratories with a supporting group of researchers in complementary fields and the opportunities to present their research at international conferences. The project aims to develop completely new ways to trap atoms using integrated photonics so the project is looking to pioneer completely new science and technology approaches to cold atoms.

In completing the PhD project, you will develop a range of skills that will enable you to have a career in either academia or industry. This will include; nano-fabrication, micro-fabrication, MEMS, vacuum systems, optics, integrated photonics, atomic physics and a range of simulation techniques. Previous PhD graduate students of Prof Paul hold a range of research fellowships, senior academic positions as well as senior positions in companies including ARM, Kelvin Nanotechnology, Sivers Photonics, Dixons Carphone, patent lawyers and multiple financial investment companies.

The ideal candidate will have a background in physics, engineering, photonics, nanotechnology, materials science or chemistry. Background knowledge of semiconductors and optics / photonics would be beneficial but not essential. No prior nano-fabrication experience is required - you will be fully trained during the PhD. You must be self-motivated, have good interpersonal skills, and be interested in conducting interdisciplinary work that combines theory, simulation, fabrication and characterisation.

How to Apply: Please refer to the following website for details on how to apply:
https://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/research/electronicsnanoscale/


Stacks Image 55
Quantum LiDAR

The James Watt School of Engineering at the University of Glasgow has a fully paid PhD scholarships (both fees and stipend for any UK or EC national) available for a quantum lidar project to start in October 2020. The quantum lidar project is linked to the UK Quantum Technology Hub for Quantum Enhanced Imaging (QuantiC) and an InnovateUK industrial programme developing lidar systems for automotive vehicles with partners including Toshiba Research Europe, IQE, Thales and Jaguar Land Rover. The successful candidates will be trained to use the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre, a 1500 m2 quasi-industrial cleanroom with over £35M of processing tools.
Successful candidates are expected to have a first or upper second class degree from a reputable university in physics, electrical and electronic engineering, photonics, materials science or a suitably aligned degree. All the projects include design, modelling, fabrication and characterisation of photonic devices and systems. The students will also be expected to fully engaged with the UK Quantum Technology Programme and Hubs.
Quantum lidar / rangefinder: Glasgow has recently demonstrated world leading Ge on Si single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs) at 1500 nm wavelength with 38% single photon detection efficiency (Nature Comms. 10, 1086 (2019)). This project aims to developed waveguide coupled Ge on Si SPADs predicted to have >70% efficiency integrated into an interferometer with Si microring entangle photon sources (Nature Comms. 6, 7948 (2015)) to enable chip scale quantum lidar / rangefinders to be produced and tested.

How to Apply: Please refer to the following website for details on how to apply: https://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/research/electronicsnanoscale/.

https://www.gla.ac.uk/study/applyonline/?CAREER=PGR&PLAN_CODES=HH56A-7201

Stacks Image 32
Nanophotonic Cold Atom Trapping

The Doppler cooling of atoms by using photons detuned by the Doppler shift from an atomic resonance allows atoms to be slowed from around 300 m/s in a gas at 100 ℃ to 1 cm/s which corresponds to a temperature of a few µK. Magneto optical traps have been used to trap these atoms but most of these use bulky optics that require significant effort to align all the optical beams and the atoms have to be slowed down by a pre-loading stage before they can be trapped.
Recently caesium atoms were trapped and cooled using a trap created by the evanescent electric field from light propagating in a silicon-nitride microring (Q = 450k) suspended from a silicon dioxide cladding membrane in a vacuum (Optica 6, 1203 (2019)) without any pre-loading. 1D photonic bandgap approaches have also been demonstrated (New J. Phys. 15, 083026 (2013)).
This project aims to develop nanophotonic structures that can trap and cool atoms to µK temperatures developing on from the silicon-nitride microrings fabricated in Glasgow which have demonstrated Q > 1.4M at 780 nm wavelength.
Successful candidates are expected to have a first or upper second class degree from a reputable university in physics, electrical and electronic engineering, photonics, materials science or a suitably aligned degree. All the projects include design, modelling, fabrication and characterisation of photonic devices and systems. The students will also be expected to fully engaged with the UK Quantum Technology Programme and Hubs.
How to Apply: Please refer to the following website for details on how to apply: https://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/research/electronicsnanoscale/